Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe

The Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe (PCNE) was established in 1994 by a number of European pharmaceutical care researchers. It became an official association (under Dutch law) in 2004.

Medication Review Drug-related problem classification Guidelines and Indicators

10th PCNE Working Conference 2017, Bled, Slovenia

Pharm.Care@BLED Build - Lead - Engage - Disseminate

1-4 February 2017


Welcome!

Bled in winter

The PCNE working conference with its fresh plenary sessions and interactive workshops provided a great learning environment to explore, discuss and share different approaches in tackling the implementation of viable pharmaceutical care services. The conference was visited by experienced researchers as well as the beginners.

This tenth(!) PCNE conference helped to build strategies for capacities needed to provide effective pharmaceutical care services and developped tools to assure their quality. Special attention was paid to discuss and advance individual as well as joint research projects. Approximately 65 abstracts were accepted and presented as poster or oral communication.

The Oral Communication Award was won by Bjarke Abrahamsen, Denmark for his presentation: 'A protocol for a cost-utility study on medication reviews', and the Poster Award was won by Susanne Erzkamp, Germany for her poster 'Development and evaluation of an algorithm in Medication Management for best practice'

The working conference celebrated its 10th anniversary, therefore some time was dedicated to relive and cherish the memories from PCNE's founding members Foppe van Mil, James McElnay, Peter Noyce and Olivier Bugnon, who became PCNE Honorary members. They passed on the enthusiasm and spirit from those times to the future work. Founding embers Martin Schulz and Dick trom, who could not be present, also became honorary member.

 

Mitja Kos (PCNE Chairperson) and Nejc Horvat (PCNE Secretary)
Faculty of pharmacy, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia

Scientific committee: Charlotte Rossing, Denmark; Veerle Foulon, Belgium; Martina Teichert, The Netherlands; Jacqueline Hugtenburg, The Netherlands; Filipa Alves da Costa, Portugal; Lea Knez, Slovenia;

Fac Pharmacy

Foppe van Mil, The Netherlands; Nejc Horvat, Slovenia; Mitja Kos, Slovenia

Organising committee: Colleagues from the Chair of Social Pharmacy, Faculty of pharmacy, Ljubljana with Foppe van Mil, The Netherlands

For all information: info@pcne.org

Download the final program (as pdf) here

 

This conference was supported by the Faculty of Pharmacy of the University of Ljubljana

 

SPONSORS

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Plenary lectures (click on title for the presentation)

- Methods to build capacity to deliver pharmaceutical care. Speaker: Alison S. Roberts, Australia

The capacity for change is a key element in enabling the sustainable delivery of pharmaceutical care services. Supporting the development of this capacity requires a focus well beyond the individual pharmacist or pharmacy, to a systems level.
This lecture will explore, through use of real-world examples, the critical factors to consider when attempting to achieve wide-scale implementation of services in community pharmacy.

Alison will provide a case study from Australia to highlight how an evidence-informed implementation science framework has been instrumental in shaping both policy and practice.   Implications for practitioners, researchers and professional associations will also be discussed.

- E-Health and Pharmacy. Speaker: Jamie Wilkinson, Belgium

The Pharmaceutical Group of the European Union (PGEU) is the European Association representing community pharmacists in 32 European countries. PGEU recently approved it’s 2016 Statement on eHealth which provides an overview of the different eHealth solutions and services provided by pharmacists across Europe. It is this Statement which provided inspiration for this presentation, outlining the developments in eHealth in the pharmacy profession in Europe over the past two decades as well as looking to future developments.
Key conclusions for consideration and discussion from this Statement include recommending (1) early and continued engagement with pharmacists as experienced users to develop eHealth policies and services at local, regional or national levels; (2) to integrate eHealth into health systems so it complements and supports existing practice; (3) to link electronic health records with ePrescribing systems and (4) to improve communication and collaboration between patients, healthcare professionals and ICT developers to obtain the full potential of eHealth technologies and build confidence and trust.

- Exploring and defining core outcomes for pharmaceutical care research. Speaker: Anna Millar, N. Ireland

It has long been recognised that heterogeneity in outcomes measured and reported in clinical trials has resulted in difficulties in assessing and comparing the effectiveness of pharmaceutical care interventions.  A potential solution to this challenge is the development and implementation of an agreed standardised set of outcomes, known as a ‘Core Outcome Set’ (COS), which should be measured and reported, as a minimum, in all trials in a specific area of research. This lecture will discuss the background to the development of COSs, including a discussion surrounding the various initiatives whose aim is to promote the widespread use of COSs in healthcare research. In addition, this lecture will provide insight into COS development methodology, using a case study of a COS which has recently been developed for use in studies aimed at optimising prescribing in older adults in care homes. Finally, this lecture will further highlight the diverse range of COS studies in the area of pharmaceutical care research, which are currently under development.

 

IMG 5856pRound Table

Confessions of the founding members. Moderator: Kurt Hersberger, Switzerland

With ontributions from Prof. Dr. Olivier Bugnon, Dr. Foppe van Mil, Prof. Dr. James McElnay, Prof. Dr. Peter Noyce and others

Pictures in the picture book

 

Short communications (click on title for the presentation)

Recognition and Addressing of Limited Pharmaceutical Literacy (RALPH): development of a screening tool for the pharmacy setting. (Abstract 135)

Ellen S. Koster, the Netherlands

Development of a medication discrepancy classification system to evaluate the process of medication reconciliation. (Abstract 143)

Enas Almanasreh, Australia

Medication persistence with lipid-lowering treatment in Slovenia. (Abstract 149)

Andreja Detiček,  Slovenia

A protocol for a cost-utility study on medication reviews to elderly polypharmacy patients at the community pharmacy. (Abstract 157)

Bjarke Abrahamsen, Denmark

Comparing Medication Regimen Complexity Index and polypharmacy as measures of medication use. (Abstract 160)

Martin Henman, Ireland

Why do health care professionals still prescribe non-selective β-blockers in patients with asthma or COPD? (abstract 166)

Esther Kuipers, the Netherlands

Criterion validation of the Living with Medicines Questionnaire Version 3 (LMQ-3). (Abstract 182)

Barbra Katusiime, United Kingdom

1. Methods to build capacity to deliver pharmaceutical care. Facilitator: Charlotte Rossing, Denmark. Expert: Alison Roberts, Australia.

As the evidence increases for pharmacists’ contribution to cost-effective care through delivery of pharmaceutical care services, so too does the expectation that pharmacists will continue to adopt and effectively deliver new services to those who can benefit most.

In many cases, pharmacy practice research and the design of services does not involve embedded concepts of implementation science; and when services are disseminated to pharmacists by professional associations, there is a gap between expectation and reality. Furthermore, investment in services by Government and other payers rarely takes into account the factors required for successful implementation - beyond education, guidelines and payments. The result is a lack of capacity across the profession to adopt and deliver services in a sustainable manner.

Click here for the Abstract for this workshop

Click here for the Workshop report

 

2. Developing indicators to measure pharmaceutical care across nations. Facilitator: Martina Teichert, the Netherlands. Experts: Martin Henman, Ireland and Foppe van Mil, the Netherlands.

In order to implement and validate  pharmacy standards and to continuously improve them, the quality of pharmaceutical care has to be measured. Thus the specification of indicators is part of guideline development. Beside pharmacists themselves, the government, health insurance companies and patients make use of indicators for different aims. To meet these, indicators have to address relevant aspects and to be reliable and informative.

Click for abstract.

Click for Introductory slides

Click for Presentation Westerlund

Click for Workshop report

 

3.  Defining a core outcome set for pharmaceutical care projects. Facilitator: Veerle Foulon, Belgium. Expert: Dr. Anna Millar, N. Ireland

Defining the right outcomes is of crucial importance in the design of any research project. So far, pharmaceutical care researchers have been struggling in defining and choosing valid outcomes that allow to prove the added value of pharmaceutical care. Moreover, each research group uses different outcomes, which makes comparing and combining data very difficult. The development of a core outcome set (COS) has the potential to reduce heterogeneity between trials, leads to research that is more likely to have measured relevant outcomes, and enhances the value of evidence synthesis by reducing the risk of outcome reporting bias and ensuring that trials contribute usable information.

Click here for abstract

Click here for report

 

4. E-health in pharmacy practice. Facilitator: Jacqueline Hugtenburg, the Netherlands. Expert: Jamie Wilkinson, Belgium

EHealth (also written e-Health) is a relatively recent term for healthcare practices supported by electronic information and communication technology (ICT), dating back to at least 1999. Usage of  the term varies. Some argue that it is interchangeable with health informatics with a broad definition that covers numerous digital processes in healthcare while others use it in the narrower sense of healthcare practice using the Internet. It also includes the use of digital media, including the internet, social media health applications and links on mobile phones and tablets, referred to as m-health or mHealth, in order to improve health related outcomes. EHealth is also becoming an important element in pharmacy and pharmaceutical care practice.

Click here for abstract

Click here for Workshop report in text

Click here for Workshop report and Intro in slides

Click here for Workshop sub-report Medication Review

Click here for Workshop sub-report Policy

 

5. Workshop Cancelled

 

6.Let's do it. - Developing a joint, international, PCNE project. Facilitator: Filipa Alves da Costa, Portugal. Expert: Lea Knez, Slovenia.

The Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe (PCNE) is an organisation devoted to the practice and research of pharmaceutical care in Europe. A number of joint research projects have been concluded succesfully.   Participants attending this workshop are expected to contribute fresh ideas and past experiences in designing a new and novel study at the very conference, and, most importantly, to have the motivation and means to develop the project in practice just after the conference.

Click here for abstract

Click here for WS report text

Click here for WS Report slides

A pdf of the final program is available here. Please also see the timetable below.

The program overview (as seen below) can be downloaded here as pdf.

 

Program overview
Time Wednesday 01/02 Thursday 02/02 Friday 03/02 Saturday 04/02
08.00-08.30   Wake up walk Wake up walk Wake up walk
08.30-09.00 Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast
09.00-09.30 SC and OC meeting  Registration  Plenary 2 Plenary 3 Finalising workshops & preparing reports
09.30-10.00
10.00-10.30 Workshops
 including break
Workshops
 including break
10.30-11.00 Closing
11.00-11.30 Break Goodbyes (& lunch opportunity at own expense)
11.30-12.00 Working group meeting: MR, DRP, Stand.& Guide.
12.00-12.30 General Assembly
members only
12.30-13.00
13.00-13.30 Lunch Lunch Lunch
13.30-14.00
14.00-14.30 Welcome & Plenary 1 Oral communications Workshops
14.30-15.00
15.00-15.30
 PCNE logo 2014-1 Red
15.30-16.00 Workshops
 including break
Workshops
 including break
Break
16.00-16.30 Round table & Laudatios
16.30-17.00
17.00-17.30
17.30-18.00
18.00-18.30 Poster discussions and drinks Soapbox
(presentation of new ideas for feedback)
members only
Break
18.30-19.00 Prešeren hall
19.00-19.30 Social event Cankar Hall
19.30-20.00 Kosovel hall
20.00-20.30 Dinner Dinner Break-out rooms
20.30-21.00 Hotel restaurant
21.00-21.30 Hotel lobby
21.30-22.00 Panorama
22.00 -             Social drinks etc. Social drinks etc. Outdoors

Abstract submission has closed.

List of accepted abstracts (click on the title to see the abstract)

ID Title Scope Organization
134 Problems with continuity of care identified by community pharmacists post-discharge. Drug-Related Problems Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, Research Group Process Innovations in Pharmaceutical Care, Utrecht, the Netherlands
135 Recognition and Addressing of Limited Pharmaceutical Literacy (RALPH): development of a screening tool for the pharmacy setting Drug-Related Problems UPPER, Utrecht University
137 Medication-Related Issues Associated with Adherence to Long-term Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for Controlling Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia: A Qualitative Study Drug-Related Problems 1) Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2)Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, UCSI University, 56000 Cheras
138 Medication Reconciliation-data and relevance in ambulatory care Drug-Related Problems Dept. of Pharmacotherapy & Translational Research, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida, USA
144 Characteristics of clinically relevant potential drug-drug interactions among ambulatory prescriptions in Slovenia Drug-Related Problems University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Pharmacy, Aškerčeva 7, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
147 Comparing findings from prospective risk analyses of the dispensing processes in Serbian and German community pharmacies Drug-Related Problems Department of Social Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Legislation, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Belgrade
158 Pharmacist-patient communication during a post-discharge home visit. Drug-Related Problems Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, Research Group Process Innovations in Pharmaceutical Care, Utrecht, the Netherlands
166 Why do health care professionals still prescribe non-selective β-blockers in patients with asthma or COPD? Drug-Related Problems Radboud university medical centre, Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Department of IQ healthcare,
167 Warfarin interactions and related side effects among outpatients in Estonia Drug-Related Problems Institute of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tartu, 1 Nooruse Str., 50411 Tartu, Estonia
169 Pharmacist interventions for broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs use in General Hospital Murska Sobota Drug-Related Problems General Hospital Murska Sobota and University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ljubljana Slovenia
170 Patient reported complaints as an inducement for interventions in medication reviews: the PROMISE randomised controlled trial Drug-Related Problems Radboud university medical centre, Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Department of IQ healthcare, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen
171 Evaluation of potentially drug-related patient-reported common symptoms assessed during clinical medication reviews, a cross-sectional observational study Drug-Related Problems 1. Radboud university medical centre, Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Department of IQ healthcare, Nijmegen
172 The role of pharmacist in medication reconciliation in General hospital Murska Sobota Drug-Related Problems University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Pharmacy
178 Drug Related Problems in Chemotherapy of Breast Carcinoma in Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria Drug-Related Problems Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Near East University, Northern Cyprus
197 Translation and validation of the CLEO tool to assess the relevance of clinical pharmacists’ interventions Drug-Related Problems Pharmaceutical Care Research Group, University of Basel, Switzerland
145 NPM: Quality of advice provided in pharmacies and parapharmacies E-Health and Pharmacy Master in Pharmaceutical Sciences Institute of Health Sciences Egas Moniz
153 e-Health Pharmaceutical Services Challenges: linking patients, pharmacists and physicians - Lessons learned from ePharmacare Project E-Health and Pharmacy Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Nova University Lisbon
154 HAITool: Supporting Clinical Pharmacist’s Role on Antibiotic Stewardship through an Innovative Information System E-Health and Pharmacy Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Nova University Lisbon
168 Economic Aspects of Medication Supply for Older Patients with Opioid-Substitution Therapy and Polypharmacy E-Health and Pharmacy Pharmaceutical Care Research Group, University of Basel, Switzerland
136 Systematic Review of Quality Indicators for Pharmaceutical Care General pharmaceutical care The University of Sydney
143 Development of a medication discrepancy classification system to evaluate the process of medication reconciliation General pharmaceutical care The University of Sydney
146 PHARMACY SERVICES PERFORMANCE AS A BASIS FOR BUILDING CAPACITY TO IMPLEMENT COGNITIVE SERVICES General pharmaceutical care University of Ljubljana, Faculty of pharmacy
150 The perspective of self-governing local communities regarding pharmacy services in Slovenia General pharmaceutical care University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Pharmacy, Askerceva 7, 1000 Ljubljana
151 THE ANALYSIS OF PROBLEMS WITH THE USE OF INHALED DRUGS AMONG PATIENTS DIAGNOSED WITH RESPIRATORY DISEASES. General pharmaceutical care Department of Social Pharmacy,Jagiellonian University Medical College
155 Pharmacy practice in community pharmacies from the view of pharmacy technicians General pharmaceutical care University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Pharmacy, Aškerčeva cesta 7, 1000 Ljubljana
159 Characteristics of the use of Proton Pump Inhibitors among Older People with Intellectual Disability General pharmaceutical care The School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Trinity College Dublin
160 Comparing Medication Regimen Complexity Index and polypharmacy as measures of medication use. General pharmaceutical care The School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Trinity College Dublin
161 HEALTH IMPACT OF PHARMACOTHERAPEUTIC DRUG INFORMATION CONSULTATIONS (PDIC) IN COMMUNITY PHARMACY General pharmaceutical care SEFAC, Farmacia Comunitaria Mislata
176 Professional autonomy correlates with quality dispensing processes and pharmaceutical care services by community practitioners in a northern county in Taiwan General pharmaceutical care Graduate Institute of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University
177 Evaluating Internal Medicine Patients’ Comprehensibility of a Standardized Medication Plan General pharmaceutical care Department of Medicine, ABDA – Federal Union of German Associations of Pharmacists, Berlin
181 Mapping the complexity of work functions related to medication in the transition between hospital and home. Piloting a new approach General pharmaceutical care Pharmakon - Danish College of Pharmacy Practice
184 Evaluation of the implementation of an interprofessional type 2 diabetes adherence program in Swiss primary care setting General pharmaceutical care Community Pharmacy, Department of Ambulatory Care and Community Medicine, University of Lausanne, Switzerland; Community Pharmacy Research Unit, School of pharmaceutical sciences, University of Geneva
186 Awareness campaign on Atrial Fibrillation in Portuguese community pharmacies – preliminary results General pharmaceutical care Farmácia Aisir, Parede, Cascais, Lisboa; and Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar Egas Moniz (CiiEM), Instituto Superior de Ciências da Saúde Egas Moniz (ISCSEM), Monte de Caparica, Lisboa
187 Overview of the legislative framework for pharmaceutical care and its role in the recognition, prevention and management of adverse drug reactions General pharmaceutical care Bulgarian Drug Agency
188 Patient access to high-priced hepatitis C antiviral medicines and financial risk associated to their delivery in community pharmacies : A case report in Switzerland General pharmaceutical care Policlinique médicale universitaire
189 IMPORTANCE OF PROMOTING BEST PRACTICES IN PHARMACEUTICAL CARE TO HEALTHCARE STAKEHOLDERS AND GENERAL PUBLIC - Croatian example General pharmaceutical care Croatian Pharmaceutical Society
192 PRACTISE Survey-PhaRmAcist-led CogniTIve Services in Europe: First results General pharmaceutical care University of Basel, Pharmaceutical Care Reserach Group, Switzerland
193 Portuguese pharmacists’ perceived needs of education in anticoagulation General pharmaceutical care Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar Egas Moniz, Instituto Superior de Ciências da Saúde Egas Moniz, Caparica, Portugal
195 Pharmaceutical counselling on anticoagulation – Identifying needs of German community pharmacies General pharmaceutical care Pharmabrain GmbH, Berlin, Germany, on behalf of International Pharmacists for Anticoagulation Care Taskforce (iPACT)
196 Impact of a Community pharmacy intervention on medicine use and Adherence Rates in patients with Osteoporosis: ICAROS-study General pharmaceutical care APB, KUL
198 MOSAIC: Presentation of a strategy for seamless care research General pharmaceutical care Pharmaceutical Care Research Group, University of Basel; Institute of hospital pharmacy, Spitaeler Solothurn, Schweiz
152 Feasibility and preliminary assessment of an interdisciplinary medication management service in Germany (ARMIN) Medication Review Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg
156 Overview of pharmacist consultant practice in the Community Health Center Murska Sobota in Slovenia Medication Review General Hospital Murska Sobota, Murska Sobota, Slovenia
157 A protocol for a cost-utility study on medication reviews to elderly polypharmacy patients at the community pharmacy Medication Review Pharmakon - Danish College of Pharmacy Practice
162 REVISA® PROJECT. IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MEDICINES USE REVIEW (MUR) SERVICE IN THE SPANISH COMMUNITY PHARMACY Medication Review SEFAC, Farmacia Comunitaria Fuenlabrada
163 REVISA® PROJECT. MEDICINES USE REVIEW (MUR) TRAINING PROGRAMME. A NEW LEARNING METHODOLOGY Medication Review SEFAC, Farmacia Comunitaria Fuenlabrada
164 REVISA® PROJECT. PILOT STUDY OF THE MEDICINES USE REVIEW (MUR) SERVICE IN SPANISH COMMUNITY PHARMACIES Medication Review SEFAC, Farmacia Comunitaria Fuenlabrada
174 Studying the Impact of Medication use Evaluation by the cOmmunity pharmacist (SIMENON): study protocol Medication Review KU Leuven
175 Development and evaluation of an algorithm in Medication Management for best practice. Effectiveness of the intervention and translation into standard care for nursing home residents-AMBER-Study, phas Medication Review Elefanten-Apotheke, gegr. 1575, Steinfurt, Germany
185 Medication Management Service in Qualified Community Pharmacies (Apo-AMTS Project) Medication Review Institute of Pharmacy, Clinical Pharmacy, University of Bonn, Germany
191 Medication possession ratio may detect half of the self-declared non-adherent patients to direct oral anticoagulation treatment – A pilot study Medication Review Pharmaceutical Care Research Group
199 From Hospital to Domiciliary Hospitalization: a Pharmacist Intervention Medication Review Centre for Interdisciplinary Research Egas Moniz (CiiEM, ISCSEM), Caparica, Portugal.
200 Experiences of pharmacists, general practitioners, geriatricians and patients with externally evaluated clinical medication reviews Medication Review VU University Medical Center, EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, Department of general practice & elderly care medicine, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
139 Willingness to pay for cognitive pharmacy service in community pharmacies Outcomes research University of Belgrade - Faculty of Pharmacy
140 Factors influencing medication adherence in unipolar depression: Exploring patients’ views Outcomes research The University of Sydney
141 Mechanisms and context factors important for successful implementation of an improvement intervention concerning medicines use in residential facilities for the disabled. Outcomes research Pharmakon - Danish College of Pharmacy Practice
148 Development and content validation of Medication Literacy Assessment Questionnaire Outcomes research University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Pharmacy, Aškerčeva 7, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
149 Medication persistence with lipid-lowering treatment in Slovenia Outcomes research Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
165 Self-Management Research of Asthma and Good Drug use: a cluster controlled trial (SMARAGD study) Outcomes research Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Department of IQ healthcare
182 Criterion validation of the Living with Medicines Questionnaire Version 3 (LMQ-3) Outcomes research Medway School of Pharmacy, The Universities of Kent and Greenwich, Central Avenue, Chatham Maritime, Kent, UK ME4 4TB
190 Analysis of the demand for antibiotics in Spanish community pharmacies with private, irregular or no prescription; interventions by the pharmacist Outcomes research SEFAC, Farmacia Comunitaria Fuenlabrada
201 Cost effectiveness of ceasing overuse of proton pump inhibitors, started as protective co-medication Outcomes research Department for Health Evidence, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen
173 Development of a transfer document for the community pharmacist at hospital discharge Standards and Guidelines KU Leuven

Alison Roberts

Dr Alison Roberts is Executive Director, Policy Advocacy and Innovation, at the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia. Her career has included roles in community pharmacy, research and consulting.  Alison’s work centres on strategies to manage change at both policy and practice levels; and she has co-authored a book on change management in community pharmacy.  Alison received the 2016 UTS Innovative Pharmacist of the Year award for her work on the Health Destination Pharmacy program, which was also the recipient of the inaugural FIP Practice Improvement Award.  With interests in governance and primary health care reform, Alison has held roles on Ministerial Advisory Committees for both the 4th and 5th Community Pharmacy Agreements (2005-2015), the FIP Working Group on remuneration, and serves on the board of South East Melbourne Primary Health Network.

Anna Millar

Anna qualified as a pharmacist in 2012 and completed her PhD in Pharmacy Practice at Queen’s University Belfast in 2015. Anna is currently working as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow with the “Care Homes Independent Pharmacist Prescribing Study” (CHIPPS) which is being led by the University of East Anglia, in conjunction with the University of Aberdeen, University of Leeds and Queen’s University Belfast.

Charlotte Rossing

Charlotte Rossing graduated from the University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences in 1998. In 2003 she received a PhD degree in Social pharmacy with a thesis named: "The Practice of Pharmaceutical care in Denmark - a quantitative approach", including 4 international publications. Charlotte then joined Pharmakon, where she is Director of Research and Development.

She has been involved in projects on the following topics:

  • Medical technology assessment of dose dispensing
  • Safe and effective medication (compliance and concordance)
  • Compliance technologies
  • Better use of medicines in residential and nursing homes
  • Medication reviews and counselling
  • Patient safety in the medication of disabled persons in residential facilities

Furthermore, she is responsible for the Danish community pharmacy evidence database, which is a searchable database containing assessed literature in intervention research in pharmacy practice and primary health care. Charlotte Rossing acts as reviewer in several international journals. She was chair and co-chair for FIP Forum for Innovators 2011-14, a programme organised by FIP Community Pharmacy Section.  She is on the Board of PCNE since 2011. 

Filipa Alves da Costa

Filipa earned her PhD from the School of Pharmacy, University of London. She now works for the Portuguese Pharmaceutical Society (PPS) as responsible for Strategic Planning, as a researcher at the epidemiology department of the cancer registry (ROR-IPOL) and at the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research Egas Moniz (CiiEM). She also holds the position of Assistant professor at the Institute of Health Sciences Egas Moniz (ISCSEM), teaching public health, health policy and pharmacoeconomics, pharmaceutical services, clinical pharmacy and pharmacology. On a National level, she is currently is also a researcher of the Portuguese Observatory of Health Systems (OPSS) and is a consultant for the National Therapeutic Formulary (appointed by INFARMED). Filipa has devoted most of her work to pharmacoepidemiology and outcomes research, particularly in the area of pharmacy practice.
She is actively engaged in various international organisations, such as iPACT (International Pharmacists on Anticoagulation Care Taskforce) and PCNE (Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe, former chairperson).

Foppe van Mil

Foppe is a community pharmacist and pharmacy practice consultant from the Netherlands who graduated in 1977. In 2000 in Groningen, he received his PhD for his work on pharmaceutical care (the TOM and OMA studies, and the implementation of pharmaceutical care). His current interest include drug-related problems, medication review and outcomes research, including process and outcome indicators. He is a founding member of the Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe, and is the professional secretary of the PCNE association.

Jacqueline Hugtenburg

Jacqueline is a Dutch community pharmacist. From 1998 up to 2004 she was involved in a variety of studies on pharmaceutical care, including patient education at first time dispensing, discharge counselling and adherence at the Utrecht University. She also investigated prescribing, use and patients’ adherence issues of methylphenidate. In 2004 she switched to the Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacy of the VU University Medical Center. Over the years Jacqueline Hugtenburg has been working on  research projects in the field of a) the pharmaco-epidemiology of diabetes mellitus, anxiety and depression and cancer, b) pharmaceutical care for older patients, patients with diabetes mellitus and cancer patients and c) drug utilization, drug use in daily practice, and drug safety. There has always been a close relationship between her activities as a community pharmacist closely cooperating with GPs (daily practice) and her research projects (academia). She is a board member of PCNE.

Jamie Wilkenson

Mr Wilkinson commenced his role as Pharmaceuticals and Professional Affairs Adviser of the PGEU in January 2014 before becoming Director of Professional Affairs in April 2015. The Pharmaceutical Group of the European Union (PGEU) is the European Association representing community pharmacists in 32 European countries. A pharmacist by training, he has practice experience in the community pharmacy sector and academia in the UK, in addition to experience in health policy, professional affairs and advocacy.
Jamie is a British national, was educated at the Universities of Kingston & St Georges London, holds an MSc in Social Research Methods from the University of Sussex and is currently working towards an MPH, Master of Public Health at the University of Sheffield. He is a Member of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society UK, a Fellow of the Royal Society for Public Health UK and a Practitioner Member of the Faculty of Public Health UK.

Martina Teichert

Martina is Scientific Advisor at the Royal Dutch Advancement of Pharmacy (KNMP) in the Hague, the Netherlands and an Associate Professor for Pharmaceutical Practice Research at Leiden University. She studied pharmacy at the Technische Universität in Braunschweig, Germany, became a pharmacist and also got a degree in economics from this university. She attained a Master degree for Epidemiology at the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam. Her PhD thesis at the Erasmus Universiteit, Rotterdam, was on ‘Pharmacogenetic aspects and drug interactions in anticoagulation therapy with coumarins.’ She supervises several Phd theses on the development and evaluation of quality indicators for pharmaceutical care and patient reported outcome measures and for the effects of tailored pharmaceutical care on asthma disease control. She teaches statistics and epidemiology for Master Students at Leiden University and trains pharmacists during their specialisation for community pharmacy. She is a board member of PCNE.

Picturebook